Tag Archives: 28april

USA: PWA Semana Conmemorativa de lxs Trabajadorxs webinar – 25 de marzo de 2021

En muchos sentidos, este año es la Semana Conmemorativa de lxs Trabajadorxs más grande que nuestro movimiento ha planeado. Mientras todas las demás lesiones, enfermedades y muertes relacionadas con el lugar de trabajo aún persisten, millones de personas han contraído COVID en el trabajo, y los ojos del público finalmente están puestos en la seguridad y salud ocupacional.

¡Únase a nuestro seminario web el próximo jueves para prepararse para la SEMANA MÁS PODEROSA DE ACCIÓN Y DE COMPARTIR HISTORIAS que conmemoran a lxs trabajadorxs! 

Fecha:                         Jueves 25 de marzo de 2021

Hora:               2:00pm a 3:30 pm Este / 1:00pm a 2:30pm Centro / 11:00am a 12:30pm Pacífico

¿Quién?          Todxs lxs que estén planeando un evento de la Semana Conmemorativa de lxs 

Trabajadorxs

¿Cómo?          ??Zoom, ¡complete esta forma rápida de inscripción!

La Semana Conmemorativa de los Trabajadorxs es una semana de acción planificada alrededor del Día Conmemorativo de lxs Trabajadorxs Fallecidxs, que se conmemora el 28 de abril de cada año. En todo EE.UU. y en todo el mundo, los sindicatos, los familiares sobrevivientes y los activistas de salud y seguridad toman medidas para recordar a aquellos que han resultado lesionados, padecen enfermedades o perdieron la vida en el trabajo y renuevan su fuego para luchar por lugares de trabajo seguros.

 

Nos vemos pronto,

USA: PWA Workers’ Memorial Week webinar 21 March 2021

In many ways, this year is the biggest Workers’ Memorial Week our movement has planned! While all other workplace-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities still persist, millions of people have contracted COVID at work, and the public’s eyes are finally on occupational safety and health.

Join our webinar next Thursday to prepare for the MOST POWERFUL WORKERS’ MEMORIAL WEEK ACTION AND STORYTELLING! 

Date:   Thursday, March 25, 2021 

Time:   2:00pm to 3:30pm ET / 1:00pm to 2:30pm CT / 11:00am to 12:30pm PT 

Who?   Everyone planning a Workers’ Memorial Week event    

How?   ?? Zoom , please fill out this quick registration form!

Workers’ Memorial Week is a week of action planned around Workers’ Memorial Day, which is commemorated on April 28 each year. Nationwide and around the world, unions, surviving family members, and health and safety activists take action to remember those who have been injured, suffered illnesses, or lost their lives at work and renew their fire to fight for safe workplaces.

 

See you soon,

Saving lives at work – Sharan Burrow

Sharan Burrow, ITUC

Saving lives at work requires occupational health and safety to be recognised as a fundamental right.

COVID-19 has exposed the risk for workers and without safe workplaces, the risks to the community. With so many frontline workers in health and care, food production and transport, the emergency services and education putting their lives on the line to do vital work, you would think everyone would know that workplace health and safety is one of the key issues in the pandemic. And with so many people having lost their jobs, on forced leave or working from home the role of safe workplaces for a stable economy is obvious.

So you might be surprised to discover that many governments and employers don’t think that being protected should be a fundamental worker’s right.

The World Health Organisation says in its constitution that “the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being”. But the International Labour Organisation has still not been able to implement the decision of its centenary conference in 2019 to include “safe and healthy working conditions in the ILO’s framework of fundamental principles and rights at work”.

This year, trade unions around the world will be pressing governments and employers to agree to put that commitment into practice.

Every year, 2.78 million working people die because of something that happens at work. Hundreds of thousands go to work and don’t make it home in one piece.

A grim occupational disease like mesothelioma, the cancer of the lining of the lung caused by asbestos.

Being buried under tonnes of agricultural slurry because basic safety precautions were ignored to save money.

And now, fighting for breath because inadequate sick pay provision and social protection mean that workers in the informal sector — two-thirds of the people at work around the world today — are being asked to choose between scraping a living at risk of catching Covid-19 and not putting food on their family table.

Governments have left nurses, doctors, and hospital cleaners without suitable masks to protect them as they treat the dying, like in Brazil where tens of thousands of health workers have died.

Employers have forced migrant workers in Australia to work at punishing paces in freezing conditions, crammed together in meatpacking factories, an ideal breeding ground for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

And health and safety inspectors in the UK haven’t prosecuted a single employer for Covid-19 health and safety breaches in the whole year of the pandemic.

These failures are just the latest in the decades-long disgrace of inadequate occupational health and safety provision. In workplaces where people matter less than profit, where budget cuts put safety on the line, where complaints are punished rather than listened to.

Making occupational health and safety a fundamental right at work — on a par with the prohibition of child and forced labour, discrimination at work, and the right to join a union, bargain collectively and ultimately to take strike action — wouldn’t solve every problem at work.

But it would make employers and governments more accountable when they fall short and a working person suffers, often leaving grieving parents, children, wives or husbands.

It would signal that workers have the right to refuse to take unnecessary risks at work. It would strengthen the hand of inspectors and health and safety professionals. It would drive better health and safety standards along the world’s supply chains.

And it would reaffirm the right of working people to be informed and consulted by their employers about the hazards in their workplaces — benefitting not just workers but the people they care for. In New York nursing homes, 30% fewer residents died where there was a union present.

Health and safety worker representatives, joint management-union safety committees, stronger laws have all been proven, time and time again, to keep working people and the public safer and healthier.

We’re calling on Governments and employer representatives at the ILO Governing Body in March to set a firm date for inserting workplace health and safety in the ILO’s fundamental principles and rights, and then deliver on it. Workers and their unions trusted it would happen this year. It just needs leaders committed to saving lives.

People’s lives matter more than money. With the Covid-19 pandemic raging in workplaces across the world, the time is now. We can’t wait any longer.

Medium, 5 Feb 2021

Africa: African Regional Organisation of the International Trade Union Confederation

ITUC-Africa issued the following statement in English and French to mark International Workers’ Memorial Day 2020.

https://www.ituc-africa.org/+-THE-TRADE-UNION-BATTLE-AGAINST-COVID-19-+.html

Ireland: Remember the dead and support those who sustain us in a crisis – ICTU

The Irish Congress of Trade Unions will mark 28 April by remembering the dead and fighting for the living.

‘Fighting for hearts and minds’ – UK Hazards Campaign 28 April briefing

The UK safety campaign group the Hazards Campaign has issued the following 28 April briefing which includes some valuable resources and information for safety reps, campaigners and organisers of International Workers’ Memorial Day activities:

International Workers’ Memorial Day, 28 April 2020: ‘Fighting for hearts and minds’

Let’s make this the biggest and best yet, get planning and organising now! Tell everyone about it – our day to Remember the dead (how and why they died) and to Fight for the Living – demand the action that will stop preventable work deaths

Please circulate the theme to relevant networks in your union, officers, reps and activists, local councillors or your MP.

Use #IWMD20 in all social media communication for global solidarity

The global union confederation, ITUC, has announced the theme for 28 April 2020: ‘Tackling psychosocial hazards at work – taking the stress out of the job’.

In UK we are using Fighting for hearts and minds

This year’s International Workers’ Memorial Day activities will highlight the harm caused by occupational stress and related conditions, including depression, anxiety, burnout, work-related alcohol and drug misuse and work-related suicides. The world’s largest health and safety event will draw together campaign targets including the harm resulting from low pay, high workloads an unacceptable working hours and work patterns. It will also highlight the real-life pressures that lead to work stress, including inadequate staffing, job insecurity, downsizing and precarious work. Bad management practices that contribute to the explosion in work-related psychosocial problems will also be highlighted, including punitive sickness absence policies and disciplinary procedures, oppressive performance management, targets and appraisal systems and a lack of control at work.

THEME in UK

Unions fighting for hearts and minds

RESOURCES – Please order resources early

Hazards Campaign resources ribbons, stickers, posters here :   http://www.hazardscampaign.org.uk/blog/hazards-campaign-28-april-2020-resources-order-form

Hazards Magazine is designing a brilliant new poster to capture the theme – preview soon…

New resources and updates on the ‘union fight for hearts and minds’ will be made available on the dedicated ITUC/Hazards 28 April website. The dedicated ITUC/Hazards 28 April 2020 International Workers’ Memorial Day website will be updated soon. https://28april.org/

Briefing and more info ASAP.

EVENTS- tell the TUC !

Events are  being organised and advertised across UK – tell the details :  info@gmhazards.org.uk and TUC at: healthandsafety@tuc.org.uk and see TUC Workers’ Memorial Day pages. https://www.tuc.org.uk/WMD

MAPPING #IWMD20  – Tell us what you are doing info@hazardscampaign.org.uk

Please tell Hazards Campaign what you are doing to we can publicise and make a MAP!

With help from our friends in Scottish Hazards we hope to follow their and the Hazards Magazine ITUC idea of mapping events and deaths, so let us know the details of your event/activity

If you need ideas and support e-mail us.

Some TUC Resources for reps, activists and campaigners and more will be produced- watch out for Hazards Magazine #IWMD20 issue

See www.hazards.org for past posters and graphics  and heartbroken poster in last Hazards magazine – get it on noticeboard to advertise #IWMD20 http://www.hazards.org/gallery/heartbroken.htm

TUC guide to responding to harmful work-related stress. https://www.tuc.org.uk/resource/responding-harmful-work-related-stress

Tackling workplace stress using the HSE Stress Management Standards, TUC and HSE guidance for health and safety representatives. https://www.tuc.org.uk/sites/default/files/tacking%20workplace%20stress%20without%20edits.pdf

TUC workbook on mental health in the workplace. https://www.unionlearn.org.uk/publications/mental-health-and-workplace

TUC mental health awareness training. https://www.tuceducation.org.uk/findacourse/courses/52

TUC health, safety and wellbeing guide. https://www.tuc.org.uk/workplace-guidance/health-safety-and-wellbeing

Hazards magazine stress and mental health webpages http://www.hazards.org/stress/ and work-related suicide http://www.hazards.org/suicide/ webpages.

Hazards magazine’s ‘heartbroken’ poster (left) can be used on a workplace union noticeboard. http://www.hazards.org/gallery/heartbroken.htm

HSE ‘reporting a concern’  https://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/reporting-concern.htm

HSE advice on How to report a work related stress concern, https://www.hse.gov.uk/contact/concerns.htm

HSE ‘Tackling Stress Workbook’ that can be downloaded for free https://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/wbk01.htm

HSE stress management standards https://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/standards/

Other HSE workplace stress resources https://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/resources.htm

Ukraine: PROFBUD remembers workers who didn’t return home from work

PROFBUD, Ukraine. In memory of workers who did not come back home from their work.

Image may contain: one or more people, tree, flower, outdoor and nature
Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, tree, crowd and outdoor

Ghana: April 28 government announcement that a work safety bill is to be passed this year

Occupational Safety and Health Bill to be passed this year

Parliament will pass the Occupational Safety and Health (OHS) Bill into law by the end of the year as part of efforts to promote workplace health and safety.

“It is vital we acknowledge that the future of work is now with us and it behoves on us to adopt, adapt and modify the nature of work and our workplaces to stay current and compliant with the OSH standards.”

Mr Ignatius Baffour-Awuah, the Minister of Employment and Labour Relations, said this on Friday on the “World Day for Safety and Health at Work” in Accra.

The event, on the theme: “Safety and Health and the Future of Work,” was organised by the Ministry in collaboration with the Volta River Authority (VRA).

Mr Baffour-Awuah called on all stakeholders in the working environment to conform to the requisite work and health safeties, as it was crucial to the attainment of the National Medium-Term Development Objectives.

He said the world of work was changing at a faster rate, with the influx of modern technology, artificial intelligence and the Internet of things among others, which came with hazards and deficiencies.

“We cannot act oblivious about the accidents and injuries these technologies may pose to the labour force,” he said.

Mr Baffour-Awuah said social partners had demonstrated enough commitment to the promotion of OSH standards to guarantee employees’ welfare and wellbeing, adding that stakeholders must not relent on that effort.

He said the significance of safety and health at the workplace was undeniably key to the full attainment of decent work agenda in Ghana.

Mr Baffour-Awuah said although there was overwhelming evidence that certain categories of the Ghanaian workplace were exposed to occupational risks and hazards, significant strides had also been made in the administration of the OSH standards through sensitisation, advocacy, compliance and enforcement.

“It is my fervent expectation that Ghana achieves the SDGs on OSH earlier than the stipulated timeframe; a task I employ all of us to embrace, other than that, our celebration of the World Day for Safety and Health at Work will be an exercise in futility,” he said.

He said the move would require investment, research, training, skills development and capacity building because employees wanted to work in an environment where their safety could be assured.

The Minister said employers, on the other hand, were seeking men and women with demonstrated safety consciousness to hire and engage, knowing that reliable assurance of safety was a guarantee of business development.

He noted that the Government was interested in a healthy workforce that could implement its policies and programmes towards growth and sustainable development of the country.

Mr Andrew A. Tagoe, the Deputy General Secretary, General Agriculture Workers Union of the Trades Union Congress (TUC), called on the Government to develop and implement a national OSH legislation and regulation.

He said the Labour Inspectorate Division of the Ministry of Employment and Labour Relations must be empowered to intensify its inspection at all workplaces to ensure safety.

Source: GNA

https://www.ghanabusinessnews.com/2019/04/27/occupational-safety-and-health-bill-to-be-passed-this-year/

Get ready for International Workers’ Memorial Day 2017

This year’s International Workers Memorial Day will focus on inequalities in occupational health and the role unions play in narrowing the inequalities gap.

The TUC says this theme for the world’s largest health and safety campaign, held on 28 April each year, will allow unions to raise discrimination based on gender, race, origins and class, which have all been linked to higher rates of occupational disease and injury.

It also allows unions to emphasis the unacceptable risks facing workers in the ‘gig’ economy, where the combination of poor conditions and job fear can amplify risks.

International Workers’ Memorial Day – TUC and ITUC/Hazards 28 April webpages. The main twitter hashtag will be #iwmd17